Gigantic Anthology

I’m thrilled that my story “Where Sisters Come From” will be included in  Best of Gigantic: Stories from the First Five Years, 2009–14, which  features forty-two Gigantic stories collected in one e-book.

BOG

Here’s a description of the anthology:
“Included are parables, fairy tales, monologues, and stories in which one might encounter a talking deer or a juggling god; a bratty cellist or a chatty head flight attendant; a body-contorting bank robber or a Nike-wearing mob boss and his personal trainer-cum-bodyguard; emperors, dictators, and would-be despots; servers, salespeople, and recently dismissed postal workers. Occasionally you won’t come across anyone at all, just a list of ways you could greet a stranger—or end up in an asylum.”

And this is the list of authors within:

Nico Alvarado, Selena Anderson, Marie-Helene Bertino, Dan Bevacqua, Anelise Chen, Joshua Cohen, John Colasacco, Jon Cotner, Lydia Davis, Rebecca Evanhoe, Jean Ferry, Sasha Fletcher, I. Fontana, Avital Gad-Cykman, Anya Groner, John Haskell, Kevin Hyde, Mitchell S. Jackson, Margo Jefferson, Etgar Keret, Michael Kimball, Carmen Lau, Kitty Liang, Robert Lopez, Ottessa Moshfegh, Iris Moulton, Stephen O’Connor, Ed Park, Thomas Pierce, Joe Mungo Reed, Helen Klein Ross, Paul Scheerbart, Sparrow, Lauren Spohrer, Saša Stanišić, Marguerite W. Sullivan, Lynne Tillman, Anthony Tognazzini, Deb Olin Unferth, Laura van den Berg, Robert Walser, and Diane Williams.

Such fabulous company to be in! Thanks, Gigantic!

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Terrain.Org

If you haven’t checked out Terrain.ORG, you should! It’s a fantastic journal with an environmental bent. Also, I just signed on as an assistant fiction editor.

Here’s some info from the journal itself:

Terrain.org: A Journal of the Built + Natural Environments is journal publishing online since 1998 that searches for the interface — the integration — among the built and natural environments that might be called the soul of place.

It is not definitely about urban form, nor solely about natural landscapes. It is not precisely about human culture, nor necessarily about ecology. It is, rather, a celebration of the symbiosis between the built and natural environments where it exists, and an examination and discourse where it does not.